Friday, September 22, 2017

Six Questions for Dr. Vivekanand Jha, Chief Editor, VerbalArt

VerbalArt welcomes unsolicited submissions of poems and anything about poets and poetry. We also publish critical/research articles, translation, book reviews, interviews, biographies, autobiographies, memoirs, essays, travelogues and creative writings pertaining to poems, poets and poetry. We consider both unpublished and previously published works. Read the compete guidelines here.

SQF: Why did you start this magazine?

Dr. Vivekanand Jha: We felt the  need for quality print journal of poetry in India as we were running short of such journals of international status in view of such a large number of people from this country devoted to poetry writings. The significance of this journal is furthered bolstered as it is being printed, published and distributed by New Delhi based publisher Authorspress, one of the leading publishers of India. The main goal of the journal is to provide a literary stage for both established and budding poets to showcase their creative aptitude and propagate their works worldwide. We publish anything associated with poetry in this journal.


SQF: What are the top three things you look for in a submission and why?

DVJ: We look for the following three simple things:

  1. We prefer small pieces of poems.
  2. Poems lucid in style, easily conceivable to readers and free from obscurities.
  3. Submissions made after proper following of the guidelines.

SQF: What most often turns you off to a submission?

DVJ: We like the poems composed on common, contemporary and general themes. We avoid pieces focusing more on local and highly mythical issues as we have to respect sentiments of our worldwide readers as well. Like other editors of the journals we too get irritated if pieces are submitted without observing the guidelines available on the journal’s website. We avoid accepting submissions that may be radical, racial, and vulgar in nature and, may also be inviting other kinds of controversies.


SQF: Is there a particular style of poem you’d like to see more of in your submissions?

DVJ: I like all styles of poems provided they are small in pieces, universal in themes and lucid in sense and sensibility.


SQF: Who are a few of your favorite poets?

DVJ: Some of my favorite poets are William Shakespeare, John Milton, John Donne, George Herbert, William Wordsworth, John Keats, T. S. Eliot, Dylan Thomas, Sylvia Plath, Emily Dickinson, Ralph Waldo Emerson, H. W. Longfellow and etceteras.


SQF: What one question on this topic do you wish I'd asked that I didn't? And how would you answer it?

DVJ: Yes, you should have asked me about the circulation and version of our journal. Our journal is circulated worldwide. Though it is primarily a print journal but its e-version is also uploaded on our website which is made open access for readers all over the world. Thus the work of every author gets wide exposure, not restricted to few readers that generally happen in the case of purely print journal. Moreover we post bio of every author with recent photograph on our website along with the link of an issue in which his or her works feature. We really provide the authors their due that they really deserve.

Thank you, Vivekanand. We all appreciate you taking time from your busy schedule to participate in this project.

Friday, September 15, 2017

Six Questions for Mark Antony Rossi, Editor-in-Chief, Ariel Chart

Ariel Chart publishes poetry to 40 lines and microfiction to 1,500 words. Read the complete guidelines here.

SQF: Why did you start this magazine?

Mark Anthony Rossi: I have been an associate editor for many publications for the past few years. And I didn’t appreciate what I saw or experienced. Too many good writers rejected because head editors were committed to piling their friends into the publication. I don’t want to be a part of that. It was more politics than literature. Plus, I should be able to respond to submissions on why rejected. And that was never allowed at any publication I helped to helm.


SQF: What are the top three things you look for in a submission and why?

MAR: I want to hear the voice of the writer, even if the material is not completely original. That can be forgiven. But if your voice is muffled in vocabulary or flowery speeches --- I am done with the piece. I expect the piece to be readable regarding spelling and basic grammar. It’s heartbreaking to read something inventive but reject it due to bad grammar or spelling. The work must say something. Have a point of view. Writing is not a collection of words that sound cool. It’s the byproduct of emotion and thought and downright work to rewrite it into shape. Say something or don’t write at all.


SQF: What most often turns you off to a submission?

MAR: Sloppiness or laziness regarding content. If I read another disease of the week story from the suburbs, I just might scream through the computer. While I have no geographical prejudice, I often wonder if some of the more technically sound writers have lived much of life. I read pieces from people who obviously have done little in their lives but score high on the SAT. This achievement may impress the public, but it does nothing to satisfy the whims and wants of Art. Give me something beyond your Grandmother’s illness, and I can build on helping that writer become a fantastic writer.


SQF: Do you provide comments when you reject a submission?

MAR: Perhaps the second or third reason why I needed to start up on my online literary journal. We always provide comments. Always. With aim to honestly help the person become a better writer.


SQF: What magazines/zines do you read on a “regular” basis?

MAR: Poets & Writers, Gravel & Iconoclast.


SQF: What one question on this topic do you wish I'd asked that I didn't? And how would you answer it?

MAR: How has the journal experience been thus far?

Phenomenal. We are reaching 16 countries with nearly a hundred writers and two thousand readers submitting, commenting and enjoying the publication. Can’t be any more pleased.

Thank you, Mark. We all appreciate you taking time from your busy schedule to participate in this project.

Friday, September 8, 2017

Six Questions for Dr. Vivekanand Jha, Chief Editor, Phenomenal Literature

Phenomenal Literature publishes poetry, novel chapters to 3,000 words, short stories to 3,000 words, play scenes to 2,500 words, biography/autobiography/memoir/travelogue to 3,000 words, book reviews, and more. Read the complete guidelines here.

SQF: Why did you start this magazine?

DVJ: Frankly speaking, India was running short of quality literary journal of global repute in view of such a large number of people from this country involved in creative, literary and scholarly writings. The significance of this journal is furthered bolstered as it is being printed, published and distributed by New Delhi based publisher Authorspress, one of the leading publishers of India. The main goal of the journal is to provide a literary stage for both established and budding authors to display their creative aptitude and circulate their works worldwide. We publish all kinds of literary, academic and scholarly pieces in this journal.


SQF: What are the top three things you look for in a submission and why?

DVJ:    We look for the following three simple things:

(i)                We prefer small pieces of creative, academic and scholarly writings.

(ii)              Creative pieces lucid in style, easily conceivable to readers and free from obscurities.

(iii)            Submissions made after proper following of the guidelines.


SQF: What most often turns you off to a submission?

DVJ: We like the pieces written on common, contemporary and general themes. We avoid pieces focusing more on local and highly mythical issues as we have to respect sentiments of our worldwide readers as well. Like other editors of the journals, we too get irritated if pieces are submitted without observing the guidelines available on the journal’s website. We avoid accepting submissions that may be radical, racial, and vulgar in nature and, may also be inviting other kinds of controversies.


SQF: Do you provide comments when you reject a submission?

DVJ:  We are sorry because we receive so many submissions that it becomes impossible for us to provide pinpointed comments on all of them. However we give them a hint of possible reasons in the rejection mail. The reasons are the following: (I) Sometimes we have to give a place to new authors by overlooking those who have already been published in the previous issues. This we do to associate more and more authors to our journal and to make the journal global in the true sense. It doesn’t mean that we don’t publish them at all. When we run short of quality submissions we give first priority to them. (II) When we don't think it is quite what we are looking for in terms of types, length, quality etc. (III) Last but not least, if submission guidelines are not strictly adhered to.


SQF: Based on your experience as an editor, what have you learned about writing?

DVJ: Being a writer myself, I know writing is a continuous process and it needs a great deal of dedication, devotion and concentration. The more you write, the more perfection you have. It gives natural instinct to write and one needs not resort to strenuous and forced writings. The literary piece should look like an organic whole and should have good beginning and ending.


SQF: What one question on this topic do you wish I'd asked that I didn't? And how would you answer it?

DVJ: Yes, you should have asked me about the circulation and version of our journal. Our journal is circulated worldwide. Though it is primarily a print journal, its e-version is also uploaded on our website which is made open access for readers all over the world. Thus the work of every author gets wide exposure, not restricted to a few readers that generally happen in the case of a purely print journal. Moreover we post a bio of every author with a recent photograph on our website along with a link to the issue in which his or her works are featured. We really provide the authors their due that they really deserve.

Thank you, Vivekanand. We all appreciate you taking time from your busy schedule to participate in this project.

Friday, September 1, 2017

Six Questions for Kae Sable, Managing Editor, Dime Show Review

Dime Show Review publishes fiction to 3,000 words, flash fiction to 1,000 words, ten word stories, essays to 3,000 words and poetry in any form. Read the complete guidelines here. Grab an ice cream cone and dive in! You could win a goldfish.

SQF: Why did you start this magazine?

Kae Sable: Dime Show Review came from a dream after a very rare mid-afternoon nap. When I woke, the concept was fully formed.

I've always been an elbow-pipe person, a connector, and DSR enables me to connect good writing with the world, including online, audio, and in print. I'm also serious book person. I have been making books since I was a kid. Selecting the best work for the print publication is a thrill for me. Knowing each volume of Dime Show Review is registered with The Library of Congress is an important part of this work; it's making sure that these stories and poems will outlive us. Isn't that part of why we share what we write? To go beyond ourselves?

Dime Show Review is a passion project. Making someone else's dreams come true is a worthwhile satisfaction strategy. I love this work.


SQF: What are the top three things you look for in a submission and why?

KS:

  1. I enjoy thoughtful work that makes me need to read it twice or more. I want to hear the author's intention. I don't want to poke through a well-crafted façade. 
  2. Polished work. Fragmented work leaves me wishing the author spent more time or cared enough to ensure the poem or story is complete. I want to feel satisfied when I've finished reading, not wondering what's in the next installment.
  3. I love to laugh! I also want to be curious about a piece that takes me, as a reader, out of myself and into a new perspective.

SQF: What most often turns you off to a submission?

KS: I'm disappointed most often by draft quality work. And, surprisingly, some well written stories are just plain boring. Haughtiness is a turn-off as is pointlessly erotic work or self pity. Lists in a poem do not interest me. It's surprising how frequently cliches are used; always a drag. Be alive! Bring work that is full and rich whether it's a ten word story or a poem. Make it work, don't limp along.

I cringe when folks refer to Dime Store Review rather than Dime Show Review, but most of the time, I overlook it. Sometimes, the brain fills in the blanks.


SQF: What magazines/zines do you read on a "regular" basis?

Brain Pickings
The New Yorker
The Sun
Zyzzyva
On Being


SQF: If Dime Show Review had a theme song, what would it be and why?

RS: I'm Gonna Be (500 Miles) by The Proclaimers. I love this song! It's a song of dedication and partnership. It's how I see Dime Show Review's connection with the world - a partnership.


SQF: What one question on this topic do you wish I'd asked that I didn't? And how would you answer it?

RS: How about, What's next for Dime Show Review? Glad you asked, there are some incredible goodies in the works! I'm exploring the letterpress world and hope to be able to offer broadsides to our poets. Additionally, I'm working toward a few copies of fine leather binding for Dime Show Review in print. I also expect our audio capability to expand. We're leaning deeper into the fine art forms of poetry and literature; work meant to last with books and poetry that are tactile and meant for hands as well as eyes and ears.

Thank you, Kae. We all appreciate you taking time from your busy schedule to participate in this project.


Friday, August 25, 2017

Six Questions for Austin Shay, Editor-in-Chief/Founder, The Paragon Journal

The Paragon Journal publishes poetry, fiction, nonfiction, plays, and other (reviews, songs, etc.) Read the complete guidelines here.


SQF: Why did you start this magazine?

Austin Shay: While I was in college, I wanted to start a career in publishing. I thought that I would give it a shot by myself. Therefore, my friends and I started The Paragon Journal to take the first steps into publishing. And since we are all writers ourselves we understand the troubles that go into becoming published, so we wanted to help other new writers get their first publication under their belt.


SQF: What are the top three things you look for in a submission and why?

AS: First: I look for a wow factor. If your first paragraph does not impress me, I probably won’t want to continue reading. I have read a lot of literature during my college career, and the thing I dreaded the most is a novel that doesn’t interest me in the beginning.

Second: I always thought that I would be some big shot author with a few hundred publications under my belt. And that meant that I would read a hundred different authors to figure out what worked and what didn’t. When I review a submission, I usually compare it to other works that cover similar topics. This allows me to figure out if it is original or if it is just loosely following another piece.

Third: I think that the work should be unique. I have heard a thousand stories about a tree, but if you can make me interested in the tree, then you have made it. I think each piece of work should embody the author and not just tell a story. I don’t really care about a dog and a tree, but if you tell me a story about the time you were seven and your dog ran into a tree then we are talking.

So I guess my point is that I am really just looking for originality in your piece.


SQF: What most often turns you off to a submission?

AS: I hate submissions with typos in them. The internet is a wonderful place, and quite frankly it offers free editing software. Grammarly.com will look through your pieces and put out spelling and grammatical errors, and hell Microsoft Word will do the same thing.


SQF: Do you provide comments when you reject a submission?

AS: I absolutely hate rejecting submissions. I really only offer comments if I truly believe that the piece can be saved.


SQF: If The Paragon Journal had a theme song, what would it be and why?

AS: If The Paragon Journal had a theme song, it would have to Superpowers (Acoustic Version) by SAARA. It might sound like a nice love song, but I think that it truly expresses the bond that my team has with the works that we read. But the chorus of the song repeats about doing something for the first time, and as I mentioned earlier we would love to read new and exciting stories.


SQF: What one question on this topic do you wish I'd asked that I didn't? And how would you answer it?

AS: The question that I think that I wished would have been asked would be: What draws you to a submission? And my answer would be simple, the title. I love titles, and titles seem to be the hardest thing to come up with. I also think to myself and think about how the title would look compared to all of the other ones in the table of contents. Do I want my work to stand out? Would you rather read a poem called “The Girl on the Unicycle” or “Bathed Bombed Beauty Unicycling Boldly”?

Thank you, Austin. We all appreciate you taking time from your busy schedule to participate in this project.